• 2018 March 13 18:16

    Subsea Industries presents its underwater coating systems

    Subsea Industries’ NACE coatings inspector Manuel Hof explains why shipowners can no longer afford to gloss over the marine environment issue, the company said in its press release.

    “Today’s ships are expected to demonstrate their environmental credentials in many different areas, including emissions, non-toxicity, fuel savings and more.

    That’s why Subsea Industries stresses that its underwater coating systems provide an optimum solution for reducing fuel consumption by maintaining a smooth surface and reducing fouling in the most environmentally-safest way possible.

    Indeed, independent tests carried out in the Netherlands and Canada have verified that all the company’s coatings – Ecospeed, Ecoshield, Ecofix, Ecolock and Ecolast –are totally biocide-free and 100% non-toxic. This means there is no negative effect on the water column or the wider marine environment at any point in their use.

    Furthermore, virtually zero volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released into the atmosphere during application, unlike the massive amounts of VOC and zinc anode emissions associated with conventional hull coating or protection systems.

    Zinc anodes are used to limit corrosion to metal surfaces that come into contact with seawater; the idea being that the anode corrodes rather than the steel surface to which it is fixed. Anodes thus can release highly toxic metals into the water, particularly when the hull protective coating is damaged leaving the steel exposed. As hard coatings, Subsea Industries’ coatings are much more resistant to damage than conventional paints.

    Subsea Industries coating systems require only two coats of 500µm each applied to bare steel, aluminium or glass-reinforced plastic. These two layers form a homogenous protective coating capable of lasting the life of the vessel. No primer, no midcoat, no tiecoat, or no topcoat are needed.

    Typical antifouling paint is applied in three or four layers and needs to be reapplied every three or four years. This will reach a point where the surface becomes too uneven because of the number of layers and resulting internal stress build-up. Then a full re-blast and re-coat will be required, meaning a considerable environmental hazard is created each time, resulting in creation of potentially toxic debris during blasting and VOC emissions when the fresh paints are applied.

    Many hull coatings contain biocides to prevent fouling by marine organisms, although the strongest and most effective biocide, tributyl tin (TBT) has now been banned. For the biocide to work, the coating must release toxins into the water. Where there is a high concentration of shipping, such as in ports and busy shipping lanes, these toxins can rise to a high-level, which has an adverse effect on fisheries and other marine life. As Subsea Industries’ products are totally biocide free no toxins are released.

    If a conventionally-coated hull is cleaned to remove fouling, even more biocides are released into the water, along with surviving organisms which are detached from the hull. The risk of introduction of invasive non-native species is thus very high, a similar risk to that imposed by discharge of ballast water. Concerns have been expressed that even more non-indigenous species (NIS) may be transported through hull fouling than through ships’ ballast water.

    In most ports around the world, underwater cleaning has come under scrutiny out of fear that viable NIS are released and spread by the operation, rather than contained and disposed of. Several ports and countries have banned underwater cleaning out of concerns of the pulse release of biocides and an increased risk of transferring NIS.

    Another important outcome of the independent test carried out by the Dutch authorities was the submission of the results to port authorities and environmental agencies worldwide in order to allow underwater cleaning of Subsea Industries coating systems. As a result, several economically important ports have made an exception to the ban and this only for Subsea Industries coatings. These ports recognise the negative impact of biocidal paints and want to support environmentally safe solutions.

    Subsea Industries has designed special tools that can be used for regular frequent in-water cleaning of hulls coated with Ecospeed. No damage is caused to the surface of the coating and none of the coating is removed – in fact the cleaning process makes the hull even smoother, further enhancing the hydrodynamic characteristics.

    A hydrodynamically smooth hull, with an absence of fouling build-up, has a significant positive impact on fuel consumption.

    A fouled hull carries with it a fuel penalty. The worse the fouling, the slower the ship will sail at a given rpm. More power will be required to keep the ship sailing at a given speed. This means higher fuel consumption. Depending on the degree of fouling, this can be as much as 85% more. Higher fuel consumption results in more greenhouse gases and other emissions which pollute the earth’s atmosphere.

    The annual fuel consumption by the world fleet is estimated at 350 million tonnes. This implies an annual CO2 output of approximately 850 million - 1.1 billion tonnes. On a global scale the potential for the reduction in fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions is enormous. If 80% of the world fleet would switch from biocidal antifoulings to Subsea Industries coating systems, this would save an estimated 28.5 million tonnes in annual fuel consumption and 90 million tonnes in annual CO2 output.

    Subsea Industries offers a TBT-free, copper-free and biocide-free solution, which release no toxins at any stage, improves with maintenance, and helps reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, sulphur and nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, zinc anode emissions and VOCs. This makes Subsea Industries coating systems the Best Available Technology for companies that take their environmental responsibility seriously.”
     
    About Subsea Industries

    Antwerp-headquartered Subsea Industries, established in 1983, is a pioneer in the development of hard hull coating systems and hull and propeller cleaning systems.
    In 2002, after three years’ extensive research and development, the company introduced Ecospeed as an environmentally safe underwater hull coating system, capable of improving ship performance, providing long-term fouling protection and reducing the impact of ship operations on the environment. Widely considered as an asset rather than a consumable – since one-coat lasts the vessel’s life time and is deemed part of a vessel’s structure, Ecospeed now has more than 700 marine references.
    Ecospeed is type approved by Lloyd’s Register as an abrasion resistance coating for ice-class ships and has DNV GL approval for use as a coating in ballast water tanks.




2018 July 15

11:24 MAN Energy Solutions ready for SMM 2018
10:43 CMA CGM informs of FAK rates from the Indian Subcontinent to North Europe and the Mediterranean

2018 July 14

12:40 CMA CGM announces GRR for Far East to East Africa trade
11:41 ABP: Container terminal operation expansion to meet growing demand
10:14 Navtek selects Corvus Energy to provide battery for the world's first all-electric tug

2018 July 13

18:50 YILPORT Holding submits offer for Taranto Container Terminal concession
18:12 Metal Shark and ASV Global introduce “Sharktech” Autonomous Vessels
17:48 ABP: £2.7 million lock gate project secures future of Newport docks
17:16 Golar LNG Partners completed acquisition of equity interest in Golar Hilli, owner of FLNG Hilli Episeyo
16:48 Total closes acquisition of Engie’s upstream LNG business and becomes world No2 LNG player
16:36 Norwegian Cruise Line confirms options for two more Leonardo-class cruise ships
16:25 Russian Minister of Natural Resources and Environment Dmitry Kobylkin visited SCF headquarters
15:59 Upgraded vessels of Project 14200 started navigation on passenger routes in Ob-Irtysh basin
15:33 Draft law on closed zones for dry bulk cargo transshipment submitted to State Duma (document)
15:12 Wärtsilä signs a EUR 170 million scrubber deal
14:37 Draft law on development of cruise tourism in Russia’s Arctic and Far East submitted to State Duma
14:24 Weatherdock AG offers fishing sector a solution to support the fight against IUU
13:49 Damen supporting European shipbuilding with NAVAIS coordination
13:11 USCG postpones underwater assessment of WWII tanker Coimbra
12:40 A £2.7 million lock gate project secures future of Newport Docks
12:11 Hapag-Lloyd to apply season surcharge for NEC to WCSA trade
11:49 London will host 9th Maritime Salvage & Casualty Response Conference on 12-13 September 2018
11:27 Hapag-Lloyd's PSS for North Europe - Caribbean, Central America trade
11:03 Throughput of port Kaliningrad in 6M’18 up 9% Y-o-Y to 7.20 million tonnes
10:38 Brent Crude futures price down 0.24% to $74.27, Light Sweet Crude – up 0.07% to $70.38
10:24 Hapag-Lloyd to apply Peak Season Surcharge for North Europe - ECSA trade
10:00 Bunker prices are going down at the Port of Saint-Petersburg, Russia (graph)
09:36 Throughput of port Tallinn (Estonia) up 1.4% to 10.09 million tonnes in HI’18
09:17 Baltic Dry Index up to 1,632 points

2018 July 12

18:21 Port of Los Angeles partners with Port of Antwerp to host simultaneous int'l "Hackathon"
18:09 DP World reiterates Validity of Doraleh Container Terminal Concession and Exclusivity Rights
18:03 High volatility in global bunker market, expert says
17:59 Throughput of port Vyborg in 6M’18 up 28% Y-o-Y to 781,200 tonnes
17:36 Maersk Supply Service completes tow of semi-submersible
17:19 Hapag-Lloyd announces port call change of Mediterranean Canada Service (MCA)
17:10 Throughput of port Primorsk in 6M’18 down 15% Y-o-Y to 26.76 million tonnes
16:45 Zelenodolsk Plant Named After M. Gorky lays down yet another small-size missile ship of Project 21631 for RF Navy
16:23 Chevron Marine Lubricants receives NOLs from MAN for use of ACOM with Taro cylinder lubricants
16:17 Teekay Offshore Partners announces expiration, final results of tender offer for its senior notes due 2019
16:13 Port of Los Angeles signs friendship agreement with three Italian ports
15:50 Throughput of port Vysotsk in 6M’18 declined by 1% Y-o-Y to 9 million tonnes
15:24 Damen begins work on Marine Aggregate Dredger dredging system
15:00 Throughput of port Shanghai (China) down 0.6% to 277.7 million tonnes in HI’18
14:42 GTT secures a tank design order from SHI for a new LNGC
14:21 Throughput of port Ust-Luga in 6M’18 declined by 4% Y-o-Y to 49.10 million tonnes
13:58 Throughput of Big Port St. Petersburg up 14% to 29.73 million tonnes in 6M’18
13:33 Sergey Grechishnikov, Production Director of ZNT Yard will be appointed as Managing Director of the company
13:15 Damen delivers two of four ASD 3212 tugs to Smit Lamnalco
12:52 Krasnoye Sormovo shipyard launches Pola Sofia,third dry cargo carrier of Project RSD59 built for Pola Rise
12:31 BMT secures new CTV order from Njord Offshore
12:10 International organizations focus on protecting fishers’ lives through ratification of IMO’s Cape Town Agreement
11:29 Vigor delivers third Hydrus class 400 passenger ferry to WETA
11:02 Fuel oil prices are flat at the Far East ports of Russia (graph)
10:28 Brent Crude futures price up 1.8% to $78.22, Light Sweet Crude – up 0.68% to $70.86
10:06 BOURBON signs general waiver with lenders
09:50 Bunker sales at the port of Singapore in 5M’18 up 1.6% Y-o-Y to 21.43 million tonnes
09:36 Throughput of port Helsinki (Finland) in 6M'18 up 10.3% Y-o-Y to 7.67 million tonnes (table)
09:18 Baltic Dry Index up to 1,586 points

2018 July 11

18:27 Port of Long Beach receives zero-emissions equipment grant
17:41 Hapag-Lloyd revises Riyadh - Customs Inspection Surcharge