• 2018 March 13 18:16

    Subsea Industries presents its underwater coating systems

    Subsea Industries’ NACE coatings inspector Manuel Hof explains why shipowners can no longer afford to gloss over the marine environment issue, the company said in its press release.

    “Today’s ships are expected to demonstrate their environmental credentials in many different areas, including emissions, non-toxicity, fuel savings and more.

    That’s why Subsea Industries stresses that its underwater coating systems provide an optimum solution for reducing fuel consumption by maintaining a smooth surface and reducing fouling in the most environmentally-safest way possible.

    Indeed, independent tests carried out in the Netherlands and Canada have verified that all the company’s coatings – Ecospeed, Ecoshield, Ecofix, Ecolock and Ecolast –are totally biocide-free and 100% non-toxic. This means there is no negative effect on the water column or the wider marine environment at any point in their use.

    Furthermore, virtually zero volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released into the atmosphere during application, unlike the massive amounts of VOC and zinc anode emissions associated with conventional hull coating or protection systems.

    Zinc anodes are used to limit corrosion to metal surfaces that come into contact with seawater; the idea being that the anode corrodes rather than the steel surface to which it is fixed. Anodes thus can release highly toxic metals into the water, particularly when the hull protective coating is damaged leaving the steel exposed. As hard coatings, Subsea Industries’ coatings are much more resistant to damage than conventional paints.

    Subsea Industries coating systems require only two coats of 500µm each applied to bare steel, aluminium or glass-reinforced plastic. These two layers form a homogenous protective coating capable of lasting the life of the vessel. No primer, no midcoat, no tiecoat, or no topcoat are needed.

    Typical antifouling paint is applied in three or four layers and needs to be reapplied every three or four years. This will reach a point where the surface becomes too uneven because of the number of layers and resulting internal stress build-up. Then a full re-blast and re-coat will be required, meaning a considerable environmental hazard is created each time, resulting in creation of potentially toxic debris during blasting and VOC emissions when the fresh paints are applied.

    Many hull coatings contain biocides to prevent fouling by marine organisms, although the strongest and most effective biocide, tributyl tin (TBT) has now been banned. For the biocide to work, the coating must release toxins into the water. Where there is a high concentration of shipping, such as in ports and busy shipping lanes, these toxins can rise to a high-level, which has an adverse effect on fisheries and other marine life. As Subsea Industries’ products are totally biocide free no toxins are released.

    If a conventionally-coated hull is cleaned to remove fouling, even more biocides are released into the water, along with surviving organisms which are detached from the hull. The risk of introduction of invasive non-native species is thus very high, a similar risk to that imposed by discharge of ballast water. Concerns have been expressed that even more non-indigenous species (NIS) may be transported through hull fouling than through ships’ ballast water.

    In most ports around the world, underwater cleaning has come under scrutiny out of fear that viable NIS are released and spread by the operation, rather than contained and disposed of. Several ports and countries have banned underwater cleaning out of concerns of the pulse release of biocides and an increased risk of transferring NIS.

    Another important outcome of the independent test carried out by the Dutch authorities was the submission of the results to port authorities and environmental agencies worldwide in order to allow underwater cleaning of Subsea Industries coating systems. As a result, several economically important ports have made an exception to the ban and this only for Subsea Industries coatings. These ports recognise the negative impact of biocidal paints and want to support environmentally safe solutions.

    Subsea Industries has designed special tools that can be used for regular frequent in-water cleaning of hulls coated with Ecospeed. No damage is caused to the surface of the coating and none of the coating is removed – in fact the cleaning process makes the hull even smoother, further enhancing the hydrodynamic characteristics.

    A hydrodynamically smooth hull, with an absence of fouling build-up, has a significant positive impact on fuel consumption.

    A fouled hull carries with it a fuel penalty. The worse the fouling, the slower the ship will sail at a given rpm. More power will be required to keep the ship sailing at a given speed. This means higher fuel consumption. Depending on the degree of fouling, this can be as much as 85% more. Higher fuel consumption results in more greenhouse gases and other emissions which pollute the earth’s atmosphere.

    The annual fuel consumption by the world fleet is estimated at 350 million tonnes. This implies an annual CO2 output of approximately 850 million - 1.1 billion tonnes. On a global scale the potential for the reduction in fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions is enormous. If 80% of the world fleet would switch from biocidal antifoulings to Subsea Industries coating systems, this would save an estimated 28.5 million tonnes in annual fuel consumption and 90 million tonnes in annual CO2 output.

    Subsea Industries offers a TBT-free, copper-free and biocide-free solution, which release no toxins at any stage, improves with maintenance, and helps reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, sulphur and nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, zinc anode emissions and VOCs. This makes Subsea Industries coating systems the Best Available Technology for companies that take their environmental responsibility seriously.”
     
    About Subsea Industries

    Antwerp-headquartered Subsea Industries, established in 1983, is a pioneer in the development of hard hull coating systems and hull and propeller cleaning systems.
    In 2002, after three years’ extensive research and development, the company introduced Ecospeed as an environmentally safe underwater hull coating system, capable of improving ship performance, providing long-term fouling protection and reducing the impact of ship operations on the environment. Widely considered as an asset rather than a consumable – since one-coat lasts the vessel’s life time and is deemed part of a vessel’s structure, Ecospeed now has more than 700 marine references.
    Ecospeed is type approved by Lloyd’s Register as an abrasion resistance coating for ice-class ships and has DNV GL approval for use as a coating in ballast water tanks.




2018 May 20

09:21 Hapag-Lloyd announces FAK rates from North Europe to Caribbean, Central America and South America West Coast
09:19 EU Ambassadors visit Peru’s largest multipurpose terminal
09:16 SEA\LNG bolsters its knowledge base with the addition of MAN Diesel & Turbo
09:13 Finnlines starts new direct service between Helsinki and Aarhus
09:11 Canadian Coast Guard selects ABS for fleetwide contract

2018 May 19

10:56 CMA CGM announces FAK rates from Asia to North Africa
10:01 CMA CGM announces PSS from Nigeria to India and Vietnam
07:50 Port of Kiel welcomes “Saga Sapphire” maiden visit
07:47 The “GRANDE HALIFAX” christened in Halifax

2018 May 18

18:00 Denis Manturov appointed as the Minister of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation
17:44 Port of Hamburg posts Q1 2018 results
17:39 Yevgeny Ditrikh appointed as the Minister of Transport of the Russian Federation (photo)
17:38 Seaspan accepts delivery of third 10000 TEU SAVER containership in four ship series
17:35 Prosafe extends standstill agreement with Cosco
17:17 Okskaya Sudoverf delivered Belmax 1, first non-self-propelled tank barge of Project ROB20
16:51 Special event on ports at IMO Headquarters will focus on single window, ports and logistics
16:35 Port of Hamburg receives ‘Best Global Seaport’ award
16:05 IMO begins scoping exercise on autonomous vessels
15:42 Brand-new jetty at Rotterdam LBC Tank Terminals ready for vessels
15:40 HELCOM group meets in Riga to discuss nutrients from land-based sources
15:39 Multimillion pound investment continues in Grangemouth, Scotland's premier port
15:38 India benefits from IMO training on port emissions
15:11 Nevsky Shipyard starts sea trials of medium sea tanker of project 23130 (photo)
14:44 Star Marine takes delivery of RAstar 3400 quartet
13:53 Ladozhsky Bridge in the Leningrad Region drawn twice to let PORT FLEET’s tugboats through
13:47 Eniram signs MoU with Arista Shipping to participate in Project Forward for developing new generation of bulk carriers
13:29 Statoil ASA changes name to Equinor ASA
13:00 Cargo turnover at inland water ways of Azov-Don Basin down 12.7% to 606,000 tonnes
12:42 ABS to provide class and certification services for the entire Canadian Coast Guard fleet
11:57 Astrakhan branch of Zvyozdochka shipyard launches rescue towboat for RF Defence Ministry (photo)
11:35 Huntington Ingalls authenticates keel of submarine Montana (SSN 794)
11:18 Akademik Lomonosov FPU arrives in the Kola Bay (photo)
11:03 UAE signs MoU with ITF
10:32 Throughput of port Kaliningrad in 4M’18 up 10% Y-o-Y to 4.71 million tonnes
10:30 Scorpio Tankers announces sale and leaseback agreements for five product tankers
10:13 Brent Crude futures price up 0.30% to $79.54, Light Sweet Crude – up 0.21% to $71.64
09:56 ZNT Yard launched the lead hydrographic survey vessel and lays down two more HSVs (photo)
09:17 Baltic Dry Index fell to 1,305 points

2018 May 17

18:05 Technava and Propulsion Analytics join forces for providing management solutions to the shipping industry in Greece and Cyprus
17:54 Throughput of port Taganrog in Jan-Apr'18 up 39.8% to 1.46 million tonnes
17:35 EUROGATE chosen as “Best Green Container Terminal Operator 2018”
17:19 Throughput of port Vyborg in 4M’18 up 22% Y-o-Y to 417,000 tonnes
17:05 Costa Group and Marseille Fos Port announce partnership
16:48 Throughput of Rostov-on-Don port in 4M’18 up 29% Y-o-Y to 5.5 0 million tonnes
16:35 Yang Ming wins Best Shipping Line – Intra-Asia Award
16:20 Throughput of port Primorsk in 4M’18 down 19% Y-o-Y to 18.10 million tonnes
16:05 ESPO congratulates seven Wadden Sea ports for obtaining EcoPorts environmental performance standard
15:37 Small-Mid Scale LNG Summit to provide industry solutions
15:34 Rimorchiatori Laziali takes delivery of two vessels from Sanmar
15:31 Konecranes Gottwald Mobile Harbor Crane for Nigerian river port
15:16 Maritime2020 to prepare shipping professionals for IMO Regulations
14:52 Throughput of port Vysotsk in 4M’18 is flat Y-o-Y at 6.19 million tonnes
14:49 Rolls-Royce and Finferries sign cooperation agreement to optimise ship safety and efficiency
14:28 Throughput of port Ust-Luga in 4M’18 is flat Y-o-Y at 32.59 million tonnes
14:05 NSW Ports introduces Australia's First Environmental Incentive for Shipping Lines
13:49 Lithuania and Poland to cooperate in defining the future transport budget of the European Union
13:04 CMA CGM announces GRR from Asia to East Africa
12:57 Autonomous maritime ecosystem to be created by 2025 under One Sea project
12:26 The port of Saint-Petersburg handled 19.31 million tonnes of cargo in 4M’18, up 16% Y-o-Y
12:04 Maersk Line recognized as the Best Global Shipping Line