News

2018 July 12 11:29

Vigor delivers third Hydrus class 400 passenger ferry to WETA

Vigor recently delivered Argo, the third of four all aluminum, 400 passenger ferries to the Water Emergency Transportation Authority (WETA) in San Francisco, California. The hull was constructed at Vigor Ballard and the superstructure in Vigor’s new aluminumPhotograph of Argo Ferry arriving in San Francisco fabrication bay at its Harbor Island facility, the Company said in its press release.

“The new fabrication bay significantly expands Vigor’s production capabilities and capacity for our portfolio of aluminum workboats, high performance military craft and state of the art ferries like Argo,” said Tim Kolb, Vigor Puget Sound General Manager. “It was fitting to have this award-winning design be our inaugural vessel for the new facility.”

Like its sister ships, Hydrus and Cetus, Argo is an efficient, environmentally friendly design by Incat Crowther. The ferry has a service speed of 27 knots and a smooth, quiet ride which Vigor Senior Project Manager, Jim Gow attributes to its “floating house.” The superstructure has 180 independent mounts. The engines and wheelhouse sit on isolation mounts while the gears are hard mounted. “This configuration greatly reduces vibration, increasing passenger comfort,” explains Gow.  

Argo features a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) after-treatment system developed by Pacific Power Group and is powered by two MTU 12V4000 M64 engines. Argo’s engines are able to burn biodiesel B5 and thereby further reduce emission, a high priority for the City of San Francisco.

Construction of Carina, the fourth WETA ferry in the Hydrus class, is already underway at Vigor with delivery expected by the end of 2018.

Principal Characteristics:
Length (overall): 135’
Beam: 38’
Draft (max): 6.75’
400 passenger
Speed: 27 knots
MTU 12V4000 M64 diesel engines
Exhaust After Treatment System
Bicycle storage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vigor is the leading provider of shipbuilding, ship repair and complex fabrication in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska with twelve locations and more than 2,500 workers. The shipyard specializes in building fishing boats, tugs, ferries, barges, fireboats, high performance combatant crafts and a variety of aluminum workboats, repairs from small fishing boats to the country’s largest catcher processors, from basic barges to state-of-the-art articulated tug and barge sets, from offshore supply vessels to floating drill rigs, and from aircraft carriers to cruise ships.