• 2019 May 6 11:33

    International large engine community calls for cross-sector cooperation to reduce shipping greenhouse gases

    The IMO decision of April 2018, calling the international shipping industry to decarbonise and at least halve its greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 was an important milestone and was largely welcomed by the global engine builders’ community. Although some parties found that the IMO target could have been even more ambitious, it clearly marked a paradigm shift: improvements in existing technologies will not be enough. Only through cross-sector cooperation and an increased focus on R&D in carbon-neutral technologies (such as batteries, fuel cells, or synthetic fuels) will shipping stand a chance of reaching the IMO 2050 target, CIMAC said in a press release.

    2050 – The day after tomorrow
    2050 may sound distant, but for the shipping community it is not. Between now and 2023, the IMO will work out the legislative steps that will pave the way for the shipping industry to achieve its goal and enable the industry to invest in new, low-carbon or zero-carbon power and propulsion systems. If these challenges are met, we will most probably be able to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 50% by 2050. If new technologies can be developed and brought onto the market in time, there is a good chance that market mechanisms will enable the fulfilment of the IMO targets. In any case, failure is not an option: not only for the sake of shipping’s reputation but, looking at the big picture, for the good of future generations.

    No ‘Silver Bullet’ in immediate sight
    Whatever the future may hold, there is no immediate “silver bullet” to meet the challenge of the IMO targets. There are some promising technical solutions, such as battery driven ships or fuel cells, but as of today, these are unable to cover the propulsion of – for instance – sea-going container vessels. We always need to keep the end-user in mind. Some technologies may have the development potential to become viable solutions for short-sea shipping, whilst others may need to be engineered to cover the demands of deep-sea.

    Moreover, current changes such as the switch to LNG are necessary and helpful, but should only be considered as bridging technologies, if they are still fossil-fuel based. Hydrogen and carbon-neutral (bio or synthetic) fuels could be considered a solution but are currently far from being competitive. Other ideas may include innovative ship design (more efficient hulls, system integration and optimization) as well as broader digitalization (including optimization of port calls and the supply chain at large). These all call for an even wider scope of parties to be involved.

    Consequently, there is a need for a consensus on finely focussed R&D activities, with well-defined aims that avoid dilution of effort by pursuing several directions at once and so wasting valuable resources. Support from regulatory bodies is key here and this means research funding; but first and foremost a clear and stable global legal framework is needed, which does not predetermine any specific technical direction. Only a rule-making that is seen to be technologically-neutral has a chance of attracting the necessary investments worldwide.

    Some low-hanging fruit is there for the taking
    To support the development of technical solutions in the medium and long-term, an efficient cross sector R&D framework must be defined and supported without delay. Moreover, there is also a need for other short-term measures. These need to focus on efficiency improvements and take account of existing and close to market-ready technical solutions, such as LNG retrofits or system optimization.

    There may be some unintended consequences to seemingly quick fixes such as a direct call to speed reductions; they do not incentivize technical progress and the switch to new technologies. Such short-term measures must be part of a larger toolbox. They must be specifically focused on the least efficient ships, and part of a range of solutions that shipowners may choose from. Moreover, some thought should be given to the fact that power limitation may be a much more efficient way to address this issue. Indeed, de-rating the engine offers the possibility of lowering the vessel’s maximum speed and thereby optimizing the actual load point with the design load point. Such a measure, based on a power limitation on the vessel, would inherently provide a speed advantage for the best performer / best design.

    The necessary developments require co-operation between all stakeholders, namely ship owners, shipbuilders, engine manufacturers, equipment manufacturers, system integrators and the Classification Societies. In advance of the upcoming MEPC74 meeting of the IMO in May 2019, CIMAC would like to underline that the organization welcomes such partnerships and calls on IMO to continue to promote and support cross-sector initiatives and R&D in shipping. The global engine builder community will discuss all these questions at the 29th CIMAC World Congress. The event takes place from 10 – 14 June 2019 in Vancouver, Canada, and all stakeholders are most welcome to participate.

    About CIMAC
    CIMAC is the leading global non-profit Association of the Internal Combustion Machinery Industry consisting of National Member Associations and Corporate Members in 26 Countries in America, Asia and Europe.




2020 August 14

10:53 First part of permanent layoff negotiations at Turku shipyard are ready
10:29 Krasnoye Sormovo lays down 23rd dry cargo carrier of Project RSD59
10:04 BlueWater Reporting issues alliance market share report
09:30 Crude oil prices start rising
09:12 MABUX: Bunker market this morning, Aug 14
09:07 Baltic Dry Index as of August 13

2020 August 13

20:58 Rosmorrechflot promotes Stanislav Uryupin to Port of Novorossiysk Harbourmaster
18:31 Glavgosexpertiza gives nod to Sovetskaya Gavan LPG terminal project
18:06 Global Industry Alliance issues Just-In-Time Arrival Guide
17:36 HMM Rotterdam en route to Rotterdam
17:18 Ust-Luga Multipurpose Reloading Complex half-year cargo volume down 9% year-on-year
17:06 The operational situation in the port of Beirut is back to normal
16:48 TCSP Group half-year throughput grows 11.4%
16:31 Kalmar service expertise to enhance safety, performance and productivity on WWO’s American routes from Manzanillo International Terminal in Panama
16:12 CMA CGM announces PSS from North Europe (except France) to Australia & New Zealand
15:26 Minister for Regional Growth and Local Government opens multi million pound bulks terminal at Teesport
15:21 St. Petersburg set to create infrastructure for all-electric passenger vessels
14:39 First supply of bunker fuel by Gazpromneft Marine Bunker to the brand new cruise ship Mustai Karim
13:52 MABUX releases weekly review of global bunker market
13:21 VIKING delivers first of ambulance boat trio for Hellenic Coastguard
12:32 Grain exports via Krasnodar Krai based seaports in Jan-Jul jump 32%
12:14 Port of Oakland import cargo volume grew 6.4 percent in July
11:33 MacGregor receives EUR 18 million RoRo orders from Japan
10:52 Australia authorities issue fumigation requirements for the 2020/2021 high risk season
10:17 Sea Port of St. Petersburg half-year cargo volume rose 3%
10:14 MABUX: Bunker market this morning, Aug 13
09:52 Crude futures prices retreat
09:32 Baltic Dry Index as of Aug 12
08:26 ME-GI engine sails through sea trials

2020 August 12

18:57 Risavika LNG index for September up by 8.9 % week on week
18:27 Andreas Rieckhof new Chairman of Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH Supervisory Board
18:08 At the three Hamburg container terminals throughput volume down 12.0 % in H1 2020
18:07 Sri Lanka Ports Authority assures safe handling of dangerous cargo under UN regulations
17:47 Rosmorport’s Azov-Black Sea branch adds TSHD Sommers to its fleet
17:43 Boluda Towage Europe takes on two new tugs from Damen Shipyards Group
16:49 Investors set to inject in excess of RUB 19 bn in federal port infrastructure facilities development
15:44 MoD eyes placing more orders for the Steregushchiy class corvettes with Amur Shipyard
15:17 Joint R&D Starts for Use of Ammonia in Marine Transportation to Reduce GHG Emissions
14:47 CMA CGM announces PSS from Asia to North Europe
14:21 MST wins contract for building 19m high-speed patrol craft duo for the Royal Navy
14:03 MOL issues an update on the Capesize bulker "Wakashio" aground off Mauritius
13:20 Port of Kiel constructs the new port apron
12:01 THE Alliance announces COVID-19 response measures for September 2020
11:57 Northern Sea Shipping acquires the MV Siyaniye Severa
10:36 LNG vessel completes 10,000th Neopanamax transit at the Panama Canal
10:02 Crude futures prices continue upward trend
09:32 Baltic Dry Index as of Aug 11
09:00 MABUX: Bunker market this morning, Aug 12

2020 August 11

18:07 Saigon Newport chooses Kalmar Essential Terminal Tractor for Cat Lai Terminal
17:43 Global Industry Alliance developes Just In Time Arrival Guide
17:36 Maersk Tankers hires Eva Birgitte Bisgaard as its new Chief Commercial Officer
17:00 CMA CGM announces PSS from Asia to North Europe
16:35 NORDEN adds 2 vessels to the existing newbuilding contract with NACKS
16:22 Murmansk Sea Fishing Port’s handled volumes in Jan-Jul dropped 12.7%
15:34 PETRONAS Research joins FASTsubsea’s subsea pump development
15:18 SCF Group's Igor Tonkovidov: Shipowners’ ability to compete with each other will be increasingly determined by their readiness to adopt advanced technologies
14:03 Houlder wins contract for Isle of Man Steam Packet Company’s new purpose-built vessel
13:39 IMO assists in MV Wakashio oil spill response
13:11 Cameron LNG Train 3 begins commercial operation
12:56 Seven-month crude exports via CPC Marine Terminal fell 1.4%